Category: my gifs

Johnny Depp by Jens Koch during the 70th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin on February 21, 2020 [x]


Johnny Depp by Jens Koch during the 70th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin on February 21, 2020 [x]

Johnny Depp as Commander Spencer Armacost in ‘The Astronaut’s Wife’ (1999)


21 year old Johnny Depp in 1984 on the set of his first film ‘A Nightmare on Elm Street’ [x]

Johnny Depp at the “Minamata” press conference during the 70th Berlinale International Film Festival Berlin at Grand Hyatt Hotel on February 21, 2020 in Berlin, Germany. [x]

Bonus: 

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The horror of toxic contamination will be relived in a film starring Johnny Depp, Bill Nighy and Hiroyuki Sanada, directed by Andrew Levitas, to be premiered at the Berlin International Film Festival starting on Thursday (20 February). Depp relives the photographic investigation of the tragedy in Japan by Life magazine photographer W. Eugene Smith.

Minamata Bay and the Shiranui Sea were heavily polluted by wastewater mixed with mercury dumped by the Chisso Corporation’s factory, particularly by methylmercury. The highly toxic compound bioaccumulated in fish and shellfish in the bay which, when eaten by the people living around the bay, gave rise to Minamata disease.

Following his days as one of the most revered photojournalists of World War II, Smith became a recluse, disconnected from society and his career. But a secret commission from Life magazine editor Robert Hayes sent him to Minamata in Japan which was being ravaged by mercury poisoning.

Smith immersed himself in the community, documenting their efforts to live with Minamata Disease and the community’s passionate campaign to achieve recognition from the corporation and the Japanese government.

Armed with only his trusted camera, Smith’s images from the toxic village gave the disaster a heartbreaking human dimension and his assignment alerted the world to the horrors of toxic poisoning. The turning point was a single picture: Tomoko Uemura in Her Bath, taken in 1971. [x]


Depp is also a producer on the film and Levitas today credited the star with being the driver on the project. “Johnny is too humble to say it; this came from him. All the passion and what we were able to do in terms of pulling it together came out of Johnny’s heart and built from there, it mattered.”

For Depp, “it was almost impossible to believe” what had happened in Minamata, “not only in such a horrific way, but it spared no one and there was absolutely nothing that they could do about it.” Learning the history “was shocking… As someone who was interested, I believed it was a story that needed to be told. And anytime that you can harness the power of media or cinema or whatever art, I think anytime you can harness that power and use it to open people’s eyes to something that did happen and does continue… If you can take an idea, bring it to a page, somebody decides they are interested in putting the thing together, somebody chucks money in because they care… Films like this don’t get made every day. We are very lucky to have the honor to bring this to people and maybe spark some degree of interest or care.”

He added, “Not one person on the film had anything other than intense dedication and felt the responsibility of having to tell Aileen and Gene’s story.”

Regarding Smith, Depp said he “always felt like he was very isolated or locked into his own peculiar understanding of fate, I suppose.”

Talking about social and political responsibility on the part of actors and filmmakers, Depp said, “I think just as people, all of us are faced with huge monolithic-sized problems at times in our lives. Whether it be some horrific disease such as the Minamata disease, or fires blazing or worlds collapsing, there’s a beautiful symbol in the I Ching that means the power of the small. So when you have these huge monolithic opponents in front of you, screaming at it is not going to do anything, trying to take the whole building down by yourself isn’t going to do anything. The power of the small is the idea that we recognize the issue and it just starts with one, you chip away little by little and then that problem can be toppled. I think that’s what it’s all about for all of us really. We are specks of dust, we are the small, so if there’s something that needs to be dealt with that’s of such magnitude, just start chipping away and people will follow hopefully.”

Depp was also asked if he might go back to directing, but noted that on 1997’s The Brave, “my head felt like it was going to explode every day,” because he was also acting in the film. “I definitely wouldn’t cast myself in a movie for sure. I think about it if I didn’t have to parade around in front of it.” [x]

“As someone who was interested, I believed it was a story that needed to be told. And anytime that you can harness the power of media or cinema or whatever art, I think anytime you can harness that power and use it to open people’s eyes to something that did happen and does continue.”

He continued, “If you can take an idea, bring it to a page, somebody decides they are interested in putting the thing together, somebody chucks money in because they care… Films like this don’t get made every day. We are very lucky to have the honor to bring this to people and maybe spark some degree of interest or care.”

Depp said that Eugene Smith “always felt like he was very isolated or locked into his own peculiar understanding of fate, I suppose”.

>Depp also said, “I think just as people, all of us are faced with huge monolithic-sized problems at times in our lives. Whether it be some horrific disease such as the Minamata disease, or fires blazing or worlds collapsing, there’s a beautiful symbol in the I Ching that means the power of the small.” The I Ching is an ancient Chinese divination text.

He said, “When you have these huge monolithic opponents in front of you, screaming at it is not going to do anything, trying to take the whole building down by yourself isn’t going to do anything. The power of the small is the idea that we recognize the issue and it just starts with one, you chip away little by little and then that problem can be toppled.”

In what could be construed as applicable to his personal life as well, Depp said of his work on the film, “I think that’s what it’s all about for all of us really. We are specks of dust, we are the small, so if there’s something that needs to be dealt with that’s of such magnitude, just start chipping away and people will follow hopefully.” [x]

Bonus:

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“This movie’s producer-star Johnny Depp has form on this score, with his starstruck impersonation of Hunter Thompson. And once again, he has chosen a role in which he wears a hat indoors. But Minamata is a forthright, heartfelt movie, an old-fashioned “issue picture” with a worthwhile story to tell about how communities can stand up to overweening corporations and how journalists dedicated to truthful news can help them.“  – The Guardian review [x]

Bonus:

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“the devastating effects of corporate greed, complicit local police and government. Armed with only his trusted camera against a powerful corporation, Smith must gain the broken community’s trust and find the images that will bring this story to the world. Johnny Depp plays the legendary American photographer with his usual consummate dedication, movingly demonstrating how fighting one’s inner demons is a necessary step on the way to greater victories.” [x]